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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"



No^UU Ca/uUina 



TOBACCO REPORT 



i96S-i969 



, Jriiiiinii I 




THE BULLETIN 

of the 
North Caroh'na Department of Agriculture 

James A. Graham, Coviyniss loner 
Number 196 Moy, 1969 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

In Memoriam 3 

Review of Tobacco Situation and Outlook — 1969 5 

The Tobacco Nesting Problem 11 

State Marketing Summary— 1908-69 14 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report, 1968-69 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales, 1968 . _ . 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cui'ed Tobacco by States, 1968 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts, 1968 19 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

Burley Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments, 1969 20 

North Carolina Burley Tobacco Allotments, 1969 22 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops, 1919-1968 23 j 

North Carolina Burley Crops, 1928-1968 24 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

By Belts and Markets 25 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption By Kinds, 1968 Back Cover 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 

Markets Division, North Carolina Department 

of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 

Curtis F. Tarleton, Director, Division of Markets 

J. H. Cyrus, In Charge, Tobacco Marketing Section 

R. L. Mozingo, Tobacco Marketing Specialist 



5/69-6M 

2 



IN MEMORIAM 



Wendell Philip Hedrick 
1898 1969 

In remembrance of the late 
Wendell Philip Hedrick whose 
death occurred March 1, 1969, 
this issue of the North Caro- 
hna Tobacco Report is dedi- 
cated in recognition of his 
long years of service as North 
Carolina's first tobacco mar- 
keting specialist. He retired 
from this position on Decem- 
ber 31, 1965, after more than 
twenty-eight years as head of 
the Tobacco Marketing Sec- 
tion, Division of Markets, N. 
C. Department of Agriculture. 

During the years he worked 
with the Department of Agri- 
culture, Mr. Hedrick helped 
tobacco farmers and other seg- 
ments of the industry solve 

many problems and crises related to the marketing of tobacco. He 
was instrumental in organizing the Tobacco Advisory Council in the 
late forties under the authority given to the North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture by the General Statutes. The purpose of this 
Council was to bring together, on an industry-wide basis, agricultural 
and related leaders who had an interest in the welfare of tobacco. 

Until his retirement at the end of 1965, he was Executive Secretary 
of the Tobacco Advisory Council, Secretary of the Tobacco Tax Council 
and a member of the Board of the Tobacco Growers Information 
Committee. 

Mr. Hedrick was a native of Taylorsville, North Carolina. He was 
graduated from George Washington University in 1918 with an A.B. 
degree in Chemistry. He was a veteran of both World War I and 
World War II. Mr. Hedrick also spent a number of years in the 
foreign service of the British American Tobacco Company, and later 
he was associated with the Farm Credit Administration in Puerto 
Rico before coming to the North Carolina Department of Agriculture 
in 1937. 

His passing adds another void to those left by men who have con- 
tributed much to the welfare of the tobacco industry in North Carolina. 




FOREWORD 




The twentieth annual issue 
of the North Carohna Tobacco 
Report has been prepared under 
the direction of J. H. Cyrus, in 
charge of the Tobacco Market- 
ing Section, Division of Markets 
of the North CaroUna Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

Much of the factual infor- 
mation in this publication was 
made possible through the co- 
operation and good relationship 
which is maintained between the various State and Federal 
agencies and other segments of the tobacco industry. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting Service of the 
North Carolina and United States Departments of Agriculture, 
the U. S. Tobacco Division Consumer and Marketing Service, 
and the Agricultural Stabilization Conservation Service for 
their contribution to this issue. 

This issue of the North Carolina Tobacco Report is dedicated 
in remembrance of the late Wendell Philip Hedrick, whose 
death occurred on March 1, 1969. Phil Hedrick was North 
Carolina's first tobacco marketing specialist — a position in 
which he served for more than twenty-eight years before his 
retirement on December 31, 1965. 



Review of Tobacco Situation and 
Outlook- 1969 

The concerted efforts and actions taken by the Industry-Wide 
Flue-Cured Marketing Committee plus the cooperation from the 
United States Department of Agriculture and all segments of 
the tobacco industry made the 1968 marketing season one of the 
smoothest in several years. Congestion in the market channels 
was at a minimum, even during the peak of the season. Never- 
theless, in terms of farmers' cash receipts from tobacco, the 
1968 season would have to be rated as one of the poorest in 
several years. 

1968 Flue-Cured Receipts Down 

The gross income to North Carolina farmers from the 1968 
flue-cured crop was about $80 million less than in 1967, even 
though the average price of $66.45 was up $2.45 per hundred 
over the previous year. Cash returns were approximately $438 
million from the sale of 660 million pounds of flue-cured tobacco 
— 651 million pounds from the 1968 crop plus about 9 million 
pounds of old crop held over from 1967. 

This was the smallest sales by North Carolina growers since 

1957, and the lowest cash income from flue-cured tobacco since 

1958. The average annual cash returns to Tarheel flue-cured 
growers during the last five years has been around $510 million. 
The sharp drop in the 1968 returns was due to a smaller allotted 
quota, which resulted from adjustments for overmarketing in 
1967 and extremely hot and dry weather that caused lower 
yields and poorer quality of up-stalk tobacco. It should also be 
pointed out that there was a total of 29,000 acres of allotted 
quota in North Carohna in 1968 that was not planted. Only 
about 4,800 acres or 9 million pounds of this unplanted quota 
were in the five-year cropland adjustment program. The re- 
mainder was acreage not planted because of labor shortage 
and other reasons. 

1968 Burley Receipts Up 
In contrast to the drop in the income of flue-cured growers, 
North Carolina burley farmers had an increase of $1.6 million 
in returns from their 1968 crop compared with the previous 
year. They received $12.6 million from the sale of slightly more 
than 17 million pounds of the best quality burley ever pro- 
duced in the mountains of this state, setting a record average 
price of $73.50 per hundred. 



Thus, the Tarheel flue-cured and burley growers combined 
received a cash income from all tobacco sold in 1968 of only 
$450.6 million compared to $529 million in 1967. 

Domestic Demand 

In spite of the never-ceasing attacks on tobacco and their 
effect on the rate of growth of the U. S. tobacco industry, the 
domestic demand for tobacco continued fairly steady during 
1968. It now appears that the domestic use of flue-cured tobacco 
during the current market year will be near the 687 million 
pounds used by U. S. manufacturers each year since 1966. 
Although domestic use has been stable for the past three years, 
it should be noted that the current use represents a drop of 
almost 100 million pounds in the average annual disappearance 
of 775 million pounds used by domestic manufacturers during 
the years from 1960 to 1965. 

This drop in domestic use can be attributed to several factors 
which include the continued increase in fllter cigarette pro- 
duction, the lengthening of filter plugs in some brands, in- 
creased use of reconstituted sheet tobacco, and increases in the 
use of foreign-grown tobacco in the cigarette blend. Also, a 
general slowdown in the growth of the tobacco industry be- 
cause of propaganda over smoking and health issues and ex- 
cessive taxation on cigarettes and other tobacco products has 
had a very definite effect on the amount of tobacco used by 
the domestic industry. Nevertheless, prospects for domestic dis- 
appearance during the 1969-70 market year should be in line 
with the volume used during the last three years. 

Export Situation 

In the export market. North Carolina and other U. S. flue- 
cured tobacco growers have benefited from the economic sanc- 
tion against Rhodesia during the past three years. As a result, 
U. S. exports reached a record level of 587 million pounds two 
years ago. Although exports did decline to 534 million pounds 
during the 1967-68 market year, they were still well above the 
average exports for the last several years. Exports for the cur- 
rent market year will probably be about equal to those for 
the previous year. 

These substantial gains in the export market in recent years 
have offset most of the decreases in domestic use of flue-cured 
during the same period. Thus, the total disappearance has been 
maintained at a level close to the last flve years' averages for 
disappearance of 1,231 million pounds. 




Unloading tobacco onto a gravity conveyor which speeds up the process of 
receiving and weighing tobacco at warehouse and reduces labor requirement 
by as much as 50 percent. 




Pre-sheeted tobacco is picked up from receiving conveyor after it is weighed 
by a forklift equipped to carry three sheets and sheets are displayed on 
sales floor. 



Therefore, the average total disappearance of flue-cured has 
been maintained at a level well above the average production; 
and the timetable established with the acreage-poundage pro- 
gram in 1965, to reduce the record surplus at the average rate 
of 100 million pounds per year until the surplus is eliminated, 
had been met through the 1968 season. 

Based on prospects for about the same domestic use and 
exports, the carryover at the beginning of the new marketing 
season on July 1, 1969, is expected to be 200 to 220 million 
pounds below the 2,302 million of mid-1968. This anticipated 
carryover is about 475 million below the peak level of mid-1965. 
The major concern as it relates to stocks on hand, is the large 
stock of more than 700 million pounds held by Flue-Cured 
Stabilization. A large volume of stabilization stocks is in B-K 
grades, which are currently in weak demand. 

1969 Flue-Cured Prospects 

The national flue-cured base quota for 1969 of approximately 
608,000 acres and 1,127 million pounds is practically the same 
as the 1968 base. However, because of net undermarketings of 
about 73 million pounds last year, the base quota will be ad- 
justed upward to give an effective acreage-poundage quota in 
1969 of around 647,000 acres and approximately 1,200 million 
pounds. 

According to the March 1 intentions of planting, only about 
585,240 acres of the effective quota will be planted in 1969. 
Based on these intentions, the U. S. production of flue-cured 
tobacco in 1969 should fall between 1,112 million and 1,170 
million, if yields should be near the average yields of the past 
four years under the acreage-poundage program. 

Even with the prospects for a larger 1969 flue-cured crop, 
average market prices should be steady to slightly higher due 
to a 2.2 cents increase in support price, boosting it to an average 
of 63.8 cents per pound. However, the success that growers have 
in eliminating (BK) grades from their crops will be the key 
to the 1969 market demand. 

In North Carolina 

In North Carolina the 1969 base allotment for flue-cured is 
approximately 400,700 acres. Net undermarketings last year 
amounted to around 45 million pounds, or about 26,000 acres, 
which brings the effective 1969 quota up to some 426,000 acres. 
This pushes the effective poundage quota to about 790 million 
pounds. However, according to the March intentions to plant 



report, flue-cured plantings in this state in 1969 will total about 
384,500 acres — some 42,000 acres less than the effective quota. 
Based on the average yields of the past four years of 1,900 to 
2,000 pounds per acre under acreage-poundage, a crop of this 
size in North Carolina would probably result in a production 
of around 730 to 770 million pounds. This would be 20 to 60 
million pounds short of the effective North Carolina flue-cured 
quota for 1969. 

Burley Prospects 

The 1968-69 burley tobacco supply is estimated at 1,881 mil- 
lion pounds — about three percent below last year's level. The 
burley supply has shown a slow but steady decrease from the 
peak level of four years ago and is now seven percent below 
the record supply of 1964. Although total supplies have de- 
clined, loan stocks have shown an increase during the past 
three years. This is an indication that buying companies are 
reducing their inventories since the total disappearance has re- 
mained fairly steady during this period at about 600 million 
pounds per year. From all indications, market demand during 
the 1969-70 market year will be in line with demands of 
recent years. 

United States burley farmers' March 1 intentions of planting 
indicated that about 237,400 acres of burley would be grown 
in 1969. This is essentially the same acreage as was harvested 
last year. Based on average yields, with allowance for upward 
yield trends, the 1969 burley crop would be about 594 million 
pounds. 

In North Carolina burley growers indicated their intentions 
of planting 7,800 acres which is the same as was harvested last 
year. Based on average yields of recent years, this would turn 
out a North Carolina crop of around 17 million pounds. 

With an increase in burley support price from 63.5 cents to 
65.8 cents for 1969, burley prices should remain close to last 
year's record prices, if growers can come up with another 
medium to thin-body smoking crop similar to the high quality 
crop of 1968. 

In general, the 1969-70 market year will find the tobacco 
industry and allied interests continuing their struggle against 
unwarranted propaganda and attacks by anti-tobacco forces and 
unfair taxation by state and local governments. The tobacco 
manufacturing industry will probably hold its own during 1969, 
although future growth in the industry will likely be slow be- 



cause of outside pressures against it. Cigarette production will 
likely hold at near the current level of about 580 billion even 
with all of the attacks against them. In North Carolina, tobacco 
will continue to be King and provide the firm base of the 
Tarheel economy. 



10 



The Tobacco Nesting Problem 

During the last several years the tobacco industry has under- 
gone quite a few changes that could be termed "progress." One 
of the most far-reaching steps taken in recent years was the 
implementation of a pre-sheeting system for untied tobacco in 
the Carolinas and Virginia as a prerequisite to the extension 
of loose-leaf or untied sales throughout the season. Under the 
pre-sheeting system each sheet of tobacco was weighed and 
displayed for sale just as it came from the farm. This eliminated 
the old process of dumping each sheet of untied tobacco onto a 
basket prior to the sale. This system of marketing pre-sheeted 
tobacco was, of course, a step forward in cutting costs and im- 
proving efficiency in handling bulky, untied tobacco. However, 
according to complaints from the buying interests, this step for- 
ward brought on a significant increase in the age-old problem 
of nesting of tobacco. 

What is Nesting? 

Nesting of tobacco, as defined under North Carolina Statutes 
is "arranging tobacco in the pile offered for sale so that it is 
impossible for the buyer thereof to pull leaves from the bottom 
of such pile for the purpose of inspection." 

It is not generally known that the practice of nesting tobacco 
is illegal. Under North Carolina Statutes, Chapter 106, Article 
40, Para. 461, the law states: "It shall be unlawful for any 
persons, firm or corporation to sell or offer for sale, upon any 
leaf tobacco warehouse floor, any pile or piles of tobacco, which 
are nested or shingled or overhung as herein defined." Para- 
graph 464 establishes penalties for the violation of nesting as 
follows: "Any person, firm or corporation violating the pro- 
visions of Paragraph 461 shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and 
upon conviction shall be fined not more than fifty ($50) dollars 
or imprisoned not more than thirty (30) days." 

The nesting of tobacco is also illegal under the Federal 
Tobacco Inspection Act. Section 10 of this Federal act provides 
that "It shall be unlawful knowing that tobacco is to be offered 
for inspection under this act to load, pack, or arrange such 
tobacco in such manner as knowingly to conceal foreign matter 
or tobacco of inferior grade, quality, or condition." Section 12 
of the act makes it a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine or 
imprisonment to offer such tobacco for inspection. 

Some other states also have laws related to the nesting of 

11 



tobacco. Thus, it is abundantly clear that deliberate nesting of 
a pile of tobacco by packing it with inferior tobacco or foreign 
matter so that it cannot be readily detected is a violation in 
several states, and it is illegal in all states under the Federal 
Tobacco Inspection Act. But, is the major problem deliberate 
nesting and mixing of tobacco or is it due to naturally mixed 
tobacco and foreign matter left in tobacco by growers because 
of the rush to get their tobacco on the market? 

Survey of Problem 

Because of widespread complaints from the buying interests 
of nested tobacco following the 1968 season, which was the first 
full season of untied, pre-sheeted sales, a survey was made with 
several buying companies in an effort to determine the scope 
of the problem. 

It was determined from the survey that only an occasional 
lot of tobacco turned up that had been deliberately nested with 
objects, such as concrete blocks, log chains, old plow points, etc. 
The reports of such objects found in tobacco were so few that 
they were insignificant. Sheets of tobacco deliberately nested 
with tobacco of inferior quality were the most common form of 
deliberate nesting reported during the 1968 marketing season. 
However, this did not appear to be any more of a problem than 
it has been in recent years. 

The Major Problem 

It was quite evident from discussions with buying companies, 
visits to processing plants and from personal observations on 
the markets that the major problem in 1968 was directly re- 
lated to pre-sheeting and the extension of untied sales through- 
out the season. This major transition in the market resulted in 
most growers becoming more lax in the practice of cleaning up 
their untied tobacco at the time it was pre-sheeted for market. 
In most instances, the loose tobacco was pre-sheeted just as 
it came from the curing barn without the removal of inferior 
leaves, suckers and foreign matter, such as strings and excessive 
dirt on lower stalk tobacco. Tobacco falling in this category does 
not come under the definition of deliberate nesting as spelled 
out under the state and federal nesting laws. 

In other words, the major problem that caused most of the 
complaints from buying companies in 1968, with pre-sheeting 
and full season untied sales was the result of a poor job on the 
part of the farmer in preparing his loose-leaf tobacco for mar- 
ket. At the same time the buying companies must share part 

12 




Foreign matter, which includes MH-30 suckers, premature leaves, strings, 
grass, paper, etc., removed by purchasers as untied tobacco is moved down a 
belt conveyor picking line at the processing plant. 

of the blame for the lax marketing practices of farmers because 
of their buying patterns which led growers to believe that it 
did not matter how poorly his tobacco was prepared for market. 
There is evidence that buying companies may look more 
critically in the future at tobacco poorly prepared for market, 
which are naturally mixed with off-color and inferior quality 
leaves, MH-30 suckers, strings, and other foreign matter. There- 
fore, growers are encouraged to take just a little more pride in 
preparing the 1969 crop for market, by culling out the off-color 
and inferior leaves, suckers, strings, and other foreign matter 
that may appear in his tobacco. It is essential that growers take 
the same pride and discretion in preparing untied tobacco for 
market as they did in cleaning up tied tobacco. Offering a 
cleaner, more uniform product for market will not only add to 
the grower's badly needed income, but it will also put our 
tobacco in a more competitive position in the domestic and 
export market. 



13 



Staf-e Marketing Summary 1968-69 

The 1968 marketing season was the smoothest in a number of years. 
The marketing of untied tobacco, which was started on a limited basis 
in the Carohnas and Virginia in 1962, reached a climax in 1968 with the 
extension of untied sales throughout the season with support price. In 
conjunction with the extension of untied sales was the cooperation of 
all segments of the industry in implementing a pre-sheeting system for 
more efficient handling of loose leaves. 

A new system of allocating selling time to warehouses on a basket- 
poundage basis was also implemented last season. These actions by the 
Marketing Committee, plus the booking of space by warehousemen, 
better distribution of sales to processors' facilities, and a shorter 
crop — all contributed to the smoother operation of the 1968 season. 

A number of warehouses installed conveyor systems in 1968 to pro- 
vide a faster and more efficient process of unloading, weighing and 
getting the farmers' tobacco on the floor. At the same time, it reduced 
the warehouse labor cost. More warehouses will move in this direction 
in 1969. 

The yields, quality, and prices for the 1968 crop were disappointing 
in many areas because of the effect of the extremely hot and dry 
weather in early August. Producer sales on North Carolina markets 
in 1968 totaled only 607,373,520 pounds compared to 752,243,870 pounds 
in 1967. These sales returned growers $403,728,327 in 1968, averaging 
$66.47 per hundred, compared to $479,327,667 in 1967, averaging $63.69. 

TYPE 13: The North Carolina Border Belt kicked off the 1968 
marketing season on July 31 — eight sales days earlier than the pre- 
vious year. The offerings in 1968 were thinner with much better 
color. A larger percentage of the crop graded in low to fair grades 
and there was less good and fine quality grades in all groups from the 
lugs through the leaf grades. Most grade prices were up $1 to $4 
compared to the previous year. 

North Carolina border markets averaged $67.39 in 1968 for 129,251,422 
pounds of tobacco sold for producers, returning them $87,107,065. In 
1967 growers selling on border markets averaged $65.62 for 149,876,333 
pounds for an income of $98,348,832. 

Final sales were held in the border on October 10, 1968, after 42 
sales days. 

TYPE 12: The big Eastern Belt started its 1968 season on August 
26 — two sales days later than the previous year. This was the only 
belt that got a later opening in 1968 than in 1967. The quality of the 
Eastern crop topped all other belts last season based on U. S. Standard 
Grades. However, the volume was the smallest in about 25 years. 
Most grade prices ranged from $1 to $9 per hundred above the year 
before. 

Producer sales totaled only 287,009,702 pounds, returning $194,193,390 
to growers for a season average of $67.66, which was the second highest 
average on record for this belt. 

The Eastern Belt completed its sales season on November 7 after 43 
days of sales. However, 90 percent of the crop was sold in 27 days. 

TYPE IIB: The Middle Belt started 1968 sales on September 3— 
about four days earlier than in 1967. Volume of sales were the smallest 
since 1943, but prices for most grades were up generally from $1 to $6. 
What appeared early in the season to be one of their best smoking 
crops in years was severely damaged in August by extremely hot and 
dry weather. The sun-baked and immature characteristic of much of 

14 



1 



the upper half of the plant caused a large volume of this tobacco 
to grade into undesirable (K) grades. 

Thus, growers sold only 106,603,657 pounds of tobacco in this belt 
for $68,416,363, averaging $64.18. Last season, growers sold 145,328,001 
pounds for $91,276,366 giving them a season average of $62.81 per 
hundred in 1967. 

Final auctions in the Middle Belt were held at Oxford on November 
12, 1968, after selling for 41 days. 

TYPE llA: For the first time, the Old Belt had a limited early open- 
ing on September 3 with one-third buying power. The early Old Belt 
opening coincided with the Middle Belt opening. This arrangement 
seemed to work out satisfactorily last season. It did provide growers 
in the Old Belt with an earlier market within their area. The Old Belt 
started with full buying power two weeks later, or at about their 
normal opening date. 

Because of unfavorable weather and adjustments for over-marketing 
in 1967, Old Belt sales dropped to the lowest level in about 25 years. 
The crop was thinner and contained less (K) tobacco when compared 
with the previous year. Most grade prices showed gains ranging from 
$1 to $7. 

Producer sales on North Carolina Old Belt markets totaled only 
84,508,739 pounds, averaging $63.91 per hundred, returning growers 
$54,011,509. In 1967 growers sold 110,231,633 pounds for $66,393,853, 
averaging $59.97 per hundred. 

The North Carolina Old Belt held final sales at Winston-Salem on 
November 26. 

TYPE 31: The North Carolina hurley markets at Asheville, Boone, 
and West Jefferson opened for the 1968-69 season on November 25. 
The hurley area stretching across the North Carolina mountains pro- 
duced what was probably one of the best quality crops ever grown in 
that area. The crop was thinner in body with lighter, truer colors 
than usual for this area. Most of the leaf, tip and non-descript grades 
showed price gains ranging from $3 to $5, and a few green grades 
were $5 to $9 higher. Most of the better grades of lugs and flyings 
were unchanged from the previous season. 

Producer sales on the three North Carolina hurley markets reached 
16,436,486 pounds, selling for a record high average of $73.54 per hun- 
dred, returning to growers $12,087,992. During the 1967-68 marketing 
season, hurley growers sold 13,775,950 pounds at an average price of 
$69.98, which amounted to a return to growers of $9,640,310. 

Asheville and West Jefferson closed for the season on January 9. 
Boone held final sales on January 10, 1969. 



15 



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17 



Summary of N. C. Dealer and 
Warehouse Resales — 1968 



Percentage 
Belt Pounds Dollars Resales 

Border Belt 

Dealer 1,260,986 

Warehouse 3,724,459 

Eastern Belt 

Dealer 2,352,377 

Warehouse 5,629,748 

Middle Belt 

Dealer 1,011,147 

Warehouse 2,873,762 

Old Belt 

Dealer 1,273,685 

Warehouse 4,710,398 

Total Flue-Cured Resales-_22,836,562 

Burley Belt 

Dealer 259,940 

Warehouse 1,135,952 

Total Burley Resales 1,395,892 1,020,333 7.83 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured 
Tobacco by States — 1 968 

Producer Sales Gross Sales 

State Pounds Average Pounds Average 

N. C. 607,373,520 $66.47 630,210,082 $66.32 

Va. 107,553,644 65.50 111,389,191 65.42 

S. C. 126,722,240 66.32 133,560,756 66.27 

Ga. 133,199,500 68.20 141,908,595 68.21 

Fla. 20,796,462 69.42 22,263,360 69.21 

Total 995,645,366 67.85 1,039,331,984 67.78 



765,705 
2,402,041 


0.94 
2.77 


1,361,193 
3,445,873 


0.80 
1.91 


591,364 
1,760,074 


0.92 
2.60 


766,121 
3,120,127 


1.41 
5.21 


14,212,498 


3.62 


190,553 
829,780 


1.46 
6.37 



18 



SfabilizaHon Receipts by Belts — 1968 



Belt Type 

Old Belt llA 

Middle Belt IIB 

Eastern Belt _. 12 

S. C. - Border Belt _. 13 

Ga. - Fla. Belt 14 

Total 11-14 



Producer 
Sales (lbs.) 



Stabilization Percentage 
Receipts (lbs.) Stab. Received 



192,062,383 
106,603,657 
287,009,702 
255,973,662 
153,995,962 



35,905,939 
26,885,440 
24,296,704 
29,324,754 
11,886,270 



995,645,366 



128,299,107 



18.7 
25.2 

8.5 
11.5 

7.7 



12.9 



Flue-Cured Movement In and Out 
of North Carolina 



state 



N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State 
(Pounds) 
1968 1967 



Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 
(Pounds) 
1968 1967 



Va. 

S. C. 

Ga. 

Fla. 
Ala. 



27,930,555 

20,775,378 

17,442,808 

1,017,950 



Total 67,166,691 



45,086,359 

23,562,734 

21,047,751 

551,376 



5,132,744 

11,575,073 

154,220 

7,716 

10,570 



90,248,220 



16,880,323 



9,104,003 

23,281,383 

99,094 

3,619 

3,719 



32,491,818 



Burley Tobacco Movement In and Out 
of North Carolina 



N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State I Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 
(Pounds) j (Pounds) 

1968 1967 I 1968 1967 



State 



Tenn. 
Va. _^ 
W. Va. 
Ga. __ 
S. C. _ 



3,270,868 
9,042 



Total 3,279,910 



2,866,242 
9,486 



2,875,728 



441,298 

946,370 

29,054 

45,836 

1,784 



1,464,342 



404,992 

835,044 

19,896 

31,480 

618 



1,292,030 



19 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments* 
1969 



County 



No. Farms 



Acreage 


Poundage 


Rank 


;'>,987.72 


6,575,872 


36 


1,136.83 


1,752,883 


51 


333.34 


482,263 


61 


8,062.00 


14,006,451 


22 


4,809.72 


8,944,273 


30 


6,238.32 


11,735,332 


26 


2,798.31 


5,269,391 


39 


.48 


822 


68 


.04 


26 


71 


405.96 


682,639 


59 


3.95 


8,092 


65 


1,139.51 


1,979,600 


50 


7,783.30 


13,075,126 


24 


2.87 


3,362 


67 


2,425.15 


3,524,607 


47 


463.53 


807,769 


58 


.29 


501 


69 


14,036.88 


30,957,737 


4 


7,206.15 


13,097,192 


23 


4,582.00 


8,524,927 


32 


.06 


67 


70 


2,758.62 


4,264,037 


44 


984.66 


1,408,905 


55 


13,120.69 


24,552,352 


10 


3,068.61 


4,569,988 


43 


9,765.62 


19,206,292 


14 


4,058.32 


6,334,580 


37 


9,661.24 


16,994,819 


17 


3.88 


5,083 


66 


227.09 


401,796 


62 


11,351.76 


18,920,413 


15 


10,148.57 


20,989,208 


13 


7,662.88 


12,595,900 


25 


4,996.73 


9,377,772 


29 


12,226.98 


24,449,345 


12 


2,762.64 


5,043,034 


40 


2,163.47 


3,936,524 


46 


1,030.15 


1,521,727 


53 


19,356.85 


38,490,850 


2 


4,593.85 


8,499,119 


33 


3,483.69 


6,134,260 


38 


11,971.10 


24,459,303 


11 


7,240.25 


14,850,723 


20 


815.34 


1,220,420 


57 


4,145.10 


7,178,573 


35 


15,326.55 


29,762,074 


6 


180.32 


285,550 


63 


404.37 


655,402 


60 


5,281.43 


8,921,803 


31 


2,809.30 


4,764,910 


42 


928.08 


1,427,052 


54 


2,796.96 


4,985,503 


41 


8,106.45 


14,353,972 


21 


21,377.04 


41,365,917 


1 


2,768.09 


4,206,711 


45 



Alamance -. - 1,447 

Alexander 915 

Anson 261 

Beaufort 2,319 

Bertie 1,667 

Bladen 3,057 

Brunswick 1,686 

Burke 1 

Cabarrus 1 

Caldwell 265 

Camden 2 

Carteret 355 

Caswell 1,927 

Catawba 2 

Chatham 1,033 

Chowan 177 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus 4,704 

Craven 1,655 

Cumberland 2,429 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1,836 

Davie 815 

Duplin 4,149 

Durham 925 

Edgecombe 1,463 

Forsyth 2,250 

Franklin 2,618 

Gaston 1 

Gates 118 

Granville 2,143 

Greene 1,254 

Guilford 3,184 

Halifax 2,059 

Harnett 3,419 

Hertford 886 

Hoke 746 

Iredell 805 

Johnston 5,311 

Jones 891 

Lee 1,269 

Lenoir 1,881 

Martin 1,474 

Montgomery 387 

Moore 1,538 

Nash 2,908 

New Hanover 83 

Northampton 214 

Onslow 1,782 

Orange 963 

Pamlico 362 

Pender 1,615 

Person 1,739 

Pitt 2,609 

Randolph 1,612 

20 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotment's* 
1969 (continued) 

County No. Farms Acreage Poundage Rank 

Richmond 919 1,7G3.75 2,650,600 48 

Robeson 4,643 17,541.63 36,241,400 3 

Rockingham 2,944 11,051.93 18,628,509 16 

Rowan 21 22.11 27,852 64 

Sampson 5,058 12,950.17 25,672,974 9 

Scotland 527 976.99 1,640,374 52 

Stokes ._. . 2,791 9,755.62 15,565,135 19 

Surry 3,080 9,292.58 16,799,268 18 

Vance _ 1,386 6,951.18 11,565,960 27 

Wake 3,672 16,553.12 30,006,877 5 

Warren 1,787 5,156.22 8,068,409 34 

Washington 277 814.05 1,331,671 56 

Wayne 3,070 12,319.41 25,738,311 8 

Wilkes 912 1,298.55 2,066,553 49 

Wilson 2,097 14,367.03 29,240,371 7 

Yadkin 2,724 6,849.42 11,530,067 28 

Unadjusted 

State Total 115,122 400,656.85 744,337,180 1-71 

Under-marketing 1968 25,547.73 44,900,415 

N. C. Total 

Allotment 1969 426,204.58 789,237,595 1-71 

^Source: USDA Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service 



21 



N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments 
1969 



County 



No. Farms 



Acreage 
Allotment 



Rank 



Alleghany 545 

Ashe 2,556 

Avery 24(;) 

Brunswick 1 

Buncombe 2,921 

Burke 14 

Caldwell 20 

Cherokee 195 

Clay 222 

Cleveland 9 

Davidson 2 

Gaston 1 

Graham 667 

Granville 1 

Haywood 1,883 

Henderson 112 

Iredell 3 

Jackson 287 

McDowell 70 

Macon 244 

Madison 2,760 

Mitchell 946 

Polk 6 

Rutherford 53 

Stokes 2 

Surry 7 

Swain 211 

Transylvania 77 

Watauga 1,667 

Wilkes 8 

Yancey 1,753 

State Totals 17,489 



219.54 


9 


1,047.59 


3 


109.37 


10 


0.09 


31 


1,404.51 


2 


4.47 


21 


6.97 


20 


68.83 


14 


85.33 


12 


3.39 


22 


0.97 


26 


0.50 


28 


301.97 


8 


0.12 


30 


946.82 


5 


42.84 


16 


1.18 


25 


107.85 


11 


25.09 


18 


78.14 


13 


2,063.90 


1 


469.43 


7 


1.77 


24 


22.66 


19 


0.34 


29 


0.94 


27 


68.59 


15 


27.93 


17 


726.18 


6 


1.83 


23 


985.73 


4 



8,824.87 



1-31 



Source: USDA Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. 



22 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919-1968* 







Yield Per 












Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 


Year 


No. Acres 


(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,000 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,508 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,441 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1,533 


702,942 


407,055 


57.90 


1960 


457,500 


1,836 


839,870 


512,731 


61.10 


1961 


463,000 


1,797 


832,215 


541,468 


65.10 


1962 


483,000 


1,890 


912,810 


549,594 


60.20 


1963 


460,500 


1,999 


920,660 


535,622 


58.18 


1964 


416,000 


2,282 


949,450 


549,875 


57.90 


1965 


375,000 


1,840 


690,050 


442,796 


64.20 


1966 


409,500 


1,859 


761,360 


506,605 


66.50 


1967 


395,400 


2,071 


818,997 


523,809 


64.00 


1968** 


355,000 


1,836 


651,625 


432,772 


66.45 



• *Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
**Preliminary for 1968 and does not include old crop tobacco sold in 
1968. 
Note: 1966 and 1967 include.s values for some production not 
marketed. 



23 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928-1968* 







Yield Per 












Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 


Year 


No. Acres 


(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


1960 


9,500 


1,940 


18,430 


12,016 


65.20 


1961 


10,400 


2,090 


21,736 


14,346 


66.00 


1962 


11,000 


2,185 


24,035 


14,421 


60.00 


1963 


11,000 


2,285 


25,135 


13,573 


54.00 


1964 


9,700 


2,165 


21,000 


12,054 


57.40 


1965 


8,900 


2,030 


18,067 


12,159 


67.30 


1966 


7,900 


2,320 


18,328 


12,371 


67.50 


1967 


7,800 


2,010 


15,678 


11,037 


70.40 


1968** 


7,800 


2,200 


17,160 


12,612 


73.50 



*Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
**Preliminary for 1968 with value based on market average. 



24 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 
By Belts and Markets 

BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers^ 

Jimmy Green Whse. — Jimmy Green 
Producers — Jack W. Garrett, Cricl<;ett Garrett 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

New Clarlvton — Maynard Talley, Cecil Hartley 

Bright Leaf — Charlie P^ord, Broodie Martin, W. W. Marlowe 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell, B. A. Powell 

Riverside — Aaron Parrish, Cliff Stephens 

Planters — Randolph Currin, John Currin, C. W. Shaw 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

People's Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, Leggett & Garrett Co. 
Davis-Mitchell-Planters— Harry Mitchell, Jack Mitchell, G. P. 

Royster, Daniel Morris, Major Meadows, W. L. Gregory 
Holiday Frye— E. H. Frye, J. W. & J. M. Holiday 
Square Deal— W. G. Bassett, C. L. Smith 
Star Carolina— W. M. Puckett, A. M. Best 
Liberty— Twin States— P. R. Floyd, Jr., Joe Pell, R. J. Harris, Bill 

Sheets, Clarence Joyce 
Big Brick— A. W. McDaniel, A. D. Lewis, Jr. 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers— P. L. Campbell, A. R. Talley, Sr., A. R. Talley, Jr., 

Don Talley 
Planters — Joe W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — J. L. Townsend, Sr. & Jr., J. E. Johnson, Jr., Sam Dunn 
Smith-Dixie — Cecil Thompson, Leslie Hall, Jack Pait 
Hedgpeth — R. A. Hedgpeth, E. H. Collins, Albert Thornton 
Liberty — H. D. Goode, R. H. Livermore, Frank White 
Star — D. T. Stephenson, Hogan Teater, Russell Teater 
Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

R. C. Coleman Co. — R. C. Coleman, Sr., Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Gray & Neal— A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 

Lea's Big Dixie — Wm. Townes Lea, Louie Love 

Liberty— J. W. Hooks, I. A. Barefoot & Sons 

Moore's — A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 

Nelson's — John H. Nelson, Jim Smith 

Planters — A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 

Smith's — Ernest Smith, Joe T. Smith, Percy McKeithan 

25 



EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, Sr. & Jr., H. G. Veazey, H. 

Jenkins 
Farmers 1 & 2 — W. M. Odoms, Pierce & Winborne, J. L. Morris 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland, N. L. Daughtry 
Ross — Clarence Kirven, Jr., W. K. Beech 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Planters — Leland Lee, J. M. Smothers 

Big 4 Warehouse — Tom Smothers, Jack Calhoun, Norman Hardee 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 
Bell's— R. A. Bell & Bros. 
Fountain & Monk No. 1 — John F. Fountain 
Fountain & Monk No. 2 — John F. Fountain 
Planters & Prewits — Chester Worthington, W. O. Newell, B. S. 

Correll 
Lee's — Gordon Lee 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina— S.G. Best, D. V. Smith, D. Price 

Farmers — Robert Lynch 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Victory — Richard Gray, Clarence Whitley 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — W. Arthur Tripp, T. P. Thompson, Harold Watson, Jack 

Warren 
Star-Planters — B. B. Sugg, Harding Sugg, Ashley Wynne 
Keel — J. A. & J. B. Worthington, Fenner Allen 
New Independent — Bob Cullifer, F. L. Blount, Jr. 
Raynor-Forbes — Noah Raynor, A. A. Forbes, Billy Clarke 
Harris-Rogers — R. E. Rogers 
New Carolina — Laddie Avery, Larry Hudson 

Kinston (four sets buyers) 

Farmers — John Jenkins, Sr. & Jr. 

Knott's 1 & 2 — Graham Knott, Billy Brewer 

New Dixie — John Jenkins, Sr. & Jr. 

Sheppard's — J. T. Sheppard 

New Central — Bill Herring, W. D. King 

Star #2 — Dempsey Hodges, Virgil Harper 

Banner — John Heath, Kirby Loftin 

Brooks — Roger & Fred Brooks 

Central — Bill Herring 



26 



Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Red Front-Adkins & Bailey — J. H. Gray, Jack Sharpe, C. R. Gray, 

& James E. Gray 
Planters — H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson, Frank Everett, H. H. 

Worsley 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton— W. E. Cobb, Jr. & J. C. Carlton 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters — S. S. Edmondson 

Smith's — Jimmie D. Smith, Sr. & Jimmie D. Smith, Jr. 

Work's — R. J. Works, Jr., A. B. Raynor 

Peoples — Guy Barnes, Gene Simmons, Jimmy Walker 

Farmers — J. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 

Farmers — Joe Stephenson,. Jerry Stephenson 

Big Planters— Mrs. W. A. Carter, Paul McMillan, Jack Wooten, 

Frank B. Skinner 
Gold Leaf— R. A. Pearce, Sr. & Jr. 
Stephenson Riverside — Gilbert Stephenson 
Wallace — Lawrence, Bobby & Larry Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clark 1 & 2— J. F. Wilson, Jr. & R. L. Dunn 
Farmers #1— J. P„ Bunn & Walter Walker 
Farmers #2— J. P. Bunn & Walter Walker 
Victory— W. L. Leggett & C. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior, R. H. Lanier 

Hussey — Joe Bryant 

Sheffields — John Sheffield, Homer M. Boney, Jr. 

Farmers — H. G. Perry 

Washington (one set buyer^) 

Sermon's — W. J. Sermon, Harry L. Roberts 
Talley— W. G. Talley 
Hassell — Malcolm P. Hassell 

Wendell (one set buyers) 

Liberty-Farmers — H. H. & Berdon Eddins 
Northside — Graham Dean, Bill Sanders 
Banner — C. P. (Pete) Souther land 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Rogers — Urbin Rogers, Russell Rogers, Leland Barnhill 
New Dixie — C. Fisher Harris, J. Elmo Lilly 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — W. C. Thompson, Buck Edmondson 

Wainwright — Geo. L. Wainwright, Sr. & Jr. 

Center Brick— S. M. Cozart, W. H. Cozart, HI, F. M. Eagles 

27 



Growers Cooperative — Clifford Aycock, Mgr. 
New Planters— W. C. Smith, R. T. Smith, Jr. 
Smith — S. Grady Deans, John F. Deans 
Clark's — Jessie Harris, "W. B. Clark, Jr. 
Liberty — C. B. Renfro 
Bob's— C. R. Clark 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Planters 1 & 2— C. B. & B. U. Griffin, Dave Newsome 
Farmers — Bill David, Norman Swain 

MIDDLE BEIiT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — Cecil Moore, J. T. Worthington, Bobby Oldham 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — E. C. Layton, Earl J. Ennis - 

Victory — E. C. Layton, Earl J. Ennis 

New Farmers — Bill Carter, Sr. & Billy Carter, Jr. 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — Walker Stone, Walker Stone, Jr. 
Roycroft — J. K. Roycroft, Randolph Currin, J. Currin, Jr. 
Star— W. W. Cozart, W. L. Currin, A. L. Carver 
Farmers-Planters — J. M. Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

EUerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Guy Sutton 

Ellerbe Whse.— C. D. Bryant, W. A. Shotwell, C. H. Buckner, Noble 

Wilson 
Richmond County — W. H. Rummage, Ashton Richardson, J. R. 

Brinond 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyersi) 

New Deal— A. R., W. M. & Dan Talley, Dan Brisson 

Star — King & Earl Roberts 

Gold Leaf— J. W. Dale, Delvin Aiken 

Carolina — C. E. Knott, E. E. Clayton, Dan Brisson 

Roberts — Joe Roberts 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Moore's Big Banner — A. H. Moore, C. E. Jeffcoat 

Carolina — J. S. Royster, F. J. Jackson 

Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 

High Price— C. B. Turner, R. E. Tanner, R. E. Fleming, S. P. 

Fleming 
Liberty — #1 — George T. Robertson, S. E. Southerland 
Liberty — #2 — George T. Robertson, S. E. Southerland 
Ellington— F. H. Ellington & John Ellington 
Alston's — W. J. Alston, Jr. 

28 



Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 

Ford's — Charlie Ford 

Friendly Four — James Speed, Gus McGhee 

Oxford (tAvo sets buyers) 

Fleming-Banner— D. T. Currin, Sr. & Jr., F. O. Finch, David 

Mitchell 
Farmers-Mangum — Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott 
Johnson High Price— C. R. Watkins, C. R. Watkins, Jr., T. J. 

Currin, J. C. Hamme 
Owen 1 & 2— W. L. Gregory, G. P. Royster, M. A. Goode, Sam M. 

Watkins, John S. Watkins, Jr., C. B. Wilkins 
Granville — L. S. Bryan, Jr., Lucious Bullock, Sidney Sherman 
Yeargin — W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Twin City— W. M. Carter, T. W. Mansfield, Jimmy Mansfield 

Morgan's — Jimmy Morgan 

Castleberry's — C. N. Castleberry, Jr., R. F. Castleberry 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 

Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 

Centre— M. P. Carroll, E. W. Radford, E. M. Moody 

Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 

Thompson — C. E. Thompson, M. P. Edwards, Jr. 

Currin's 1 & 2— C. W. Currin 

OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — H. L. Perkins, S. L. Russell 
Coble — N. C. Newman, Joe Robertson 
Farmers — Bill McCauley, Glenn McCray 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tob. Whse. Co. — R. C. Coleman, Jr., Mgr. 
Guilford Tob. Whse.— H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— S. F. Webster, Lloyd Webster 

Carolina — S. F. Webster, Lee McCollum 

Sharpe & Smith Farmers — W. S. Smith, D. C. Hoilman 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Jule Allen, Bill Allen 
Piedmont — Billy Hopkins, Jimmy Hopkins 

Mt. Airy (one set buyersi) 

New Farmers — Tom Jones, Ralph White, O. L. Badgett, Boyd Cain, 

F. V. Dearmin, Jr. 
Dixie— W. H. Brown, H. Y. Hodges, Fred E. Chilton 
Hunter's — J. W. Hunter, W. R. Fowler 

29 



i 



Reidsville (on© set buyers) 

New Farmers— G. E. Smith, Steve Smith, P. D. McMichael, Phillip 

Carter 
Leader-Watts — A. P. Sands, W. A. McKinney, Tom Kimbro 
Smothers — T. G. Smothers, Tom Garland 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. A. Hester 
Hyco — F. J. Hester, Jr. 
Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 
Planters Whse. #2— T. O. Pass, Sr. & Jr. 
Pioneer — Elmo Mitchell, Roy Carver 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Joyce's — O. P. Joyce, W. R. Joyce 

Farmers — R. N. Linville, Clarence Peeples, W. Q. Chilton, Robert 

and Garland Rakestraw 
Piedmont — R. N. Linville, Clarence Peeples, W. Q. Chilton, Robert 

and Garland Rakestraw _ 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Carolina-Star — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson, G. H. Robertson, "^ 

H. M. Bouldin 
Growers— W. G. Sheets, Joe Pell, C. R. Harris, R. J. Harris, M. M. 

Joyner 
Pepper's — C. F. Hutchins, Joe Cook, Homer Dearmin 
Taylor — Paris M. Pepper, John Nelson, A. C. Cashwell 
Big Winston — Taylor Carter & Jack Carter 
Cook's — B. E. Cook, William Fowler, Claude Strickland, Jr. 

Yadkinville (full buying power not represented) 

Millers Tob. Warehouse — R. A. Owen, Anderson Miller 

BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers) 

Dixie-Burley — R. A. Owen 
Planters — J. W. Stewart 
Walker Warehouse — James E. Walker 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Farmers & Big Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Farmers Burley — Mrs. Tom Faulkner 






30 






STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

James A. Graham, Commissioner 

Ex-Officio Chairman 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

Richard N. Barber, Jr Waynesville 

Fred N. Colvard Jefferson 

Guy E. Fisher Pendleton 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

Henry Gray Shelton Speed 

David Townsend, Jr Rowland 



31 



DOMESTIC TAX PAID CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS 1968 




Total Domestic Consumption 
523 BILLION CIGARETTES